ED677 Reflections on Assessment                Kathy Walsh    4/26/2015I did a lot of reflecting on…

ED677 Reflections on Assessment                Kathy Walsh    4/26/2015

I did a lot of reflecting on all I have been learning in more detail in my last S7S, but here are more specific answers to the performance assessment questions.

How well do you feel you met the performance expectations this semester?

I feel that connected learning is a multifaceted framework and for me it has taken time to reach a more profound understanding of its principles through participating in the many aspects of this class.   As a person who has been largely left behind by quickly changing technological and social media landscape almost all of the things I have learned about and done in this class have been for the first time and therefore have taken me out of my comfort zone and into new ways of thinking and doing.  Some examples of things that have helped me develop as a connected learner and teacher are:  

·        The readings and watchings such as text chapters blog posts, past google hangouts, articles and videos on connected learning such as Teaching in the Connected Learning Classroom and also on specific interests of mine such as science and social justice and civic learning and practices for establishing maker spaces.

·        My participation in communities of inquiry and practice in our class google hangouts and google plus community, where I have been contributing my unique perspective to our collective learning efforts through the hangouts and my responses to other students’ work, where I contributed and also learned from my classmates.  

·        My participation in other networked communities outside the class, such as in STEM, NSTA, maker space education, social justice education such as the YPAR iTAGs group and larger iTAGs community and also the baby steps I took into twitter, Pinterest, Facebook and Linked in.

·        My makes using digital tools such as:  social justice and science curations, urban youth themed memes, a valentines remix, gliffy map of my learning journey, and attempt to make a badge.

·        The maker space I started,  including the creation of activities for it, the community service project of having the maker students work with younger students,  and an open class blog

·        My weekly blog posts in my Making it Matter blog, and my tumblr S7S reflections blog.  

 

Where do you think you could have improved?

All of the above.  I am usually not satisfied with first attempts and so I always think I can improve by reflecting and trying things again. I had difficulty functioning in twitter, and especially in the twitter chat but I have decided to remain open minded and to keep on trying to get more comfortable with it.  I need to work at developing more connections through my blog and contributing more to the networked communities I have joined.    I need to work on my self confidence in order to do those things.  After a month of my maker space being up and running, it could use a lot of growth and development.  The main issue is that the students have not developed a shared sense of purpose in working toward a common goal.  I know that is the key to students wanting to engage in intellectually challenging work.

How do your successes and reflections on improvement inform your connected learning moving forward?

My goal and my challenge is how to get students to want to engage in intellectually rigorous work. For students in urban schools who have been traditionally marginalized in science education, this is a big challenge. The traditional models of education in which teachers try to tightly control the outcomes to fit tests and by using drilling of information causes great inequity in education.   Equity occurs when students work toward a common goal with a shared sense of purpose and see that they have a voice and can make change on problems and issues that matter to them.   However this is not an easy thing to have happen.  It must come from student interests and the problems that they have that go beyond the classroom. They must critically examine what they are learning and the structures that create inequity around them.   Education must be designed so that students can work collectively to make a change that they find meaningful.  Connected learning can help teachers create entry points for students to go down their own paths of discovery and identify formation.  

Going forward I will have to be more open and encouraging of a dialogue with students and getting to know students better in order to have this come from them.   When I receive curriculum that does not give students these dialogues and entry points, I will have to create them by hacking the curriculum to be more relevant for my students and open up spaces for creativity and connection to meaning. I will examine the content with the students with a critical eye.    I will use connected learning to break through the barriers they face and give students an authentic audience in order to solve real problems.  For example I was thinking of cultivating the relationships I make with the black and Latino scientists, (once I finally get connected with them) so my students can have interactive mentors for their science projects.  Also I was thinking they might come and attend the students’ final presentations of their projects and help me in creating badges for the students.  

By including connected learning and critical pedagogy perspectives and practices I hope to bring more equity to education.    This will require me to continue to develop myself as a connected educator and a critical pedagogue. This class pushed me to try new things and has resulted in the development of my identity as a connected learner and also to dream about trying these ideas out with my future classes when I am again in the role of a classroom teacher.  

Thanks for a great semester, Christina and if you have any ideas for another connected learning class you recommend please let me know.

Kathy

ED677 Reflections on Assessment                Kathy Walsh    4/26/2015I did a lot of reflecting on…

ED677 Reflections on Assessment                Kathy Walsh    4/26/2015

I did a lot of reflecting on all I have been learning in more detail in my last S7S, but here are more specific answers to the performance assessment questions.

How well do you feel you met the performance expectations this semester?

I feel that connected learning is a multifaceted framework and for me it has taken time to reach a more profound understanding of its principles through participating in the many aspects of this class.   As a person who has been largely left behind by quickly changing technological and social media landscape almost all of the things I have learned about and done in this class have been for the first time and therefore have taken me out of my comfort zone and into new ways of thinking and doing.  Some examples of things that have helped me develop as a connected learner and teacher are:  

·        The readings and watchings such as text chapters blog posts, past google hangouts, articles and videos on connected learning such as Teaching in the Connected Learning Classroom and also on specific interests of mine such as science and social justice and civic learning and practices for establishing maker spaces.

·        My participation in communities of inquiry and practice in our class google hangouts and google plus community, where I have been contributing my unique perspective to our collective learning efforts through the hangouts and my responses to other students’ work, where I contributed and also learned from my classmates.  

·        My participation in other networked communities outside the class, such as in STEM, NSTA, maker space education, social justice education such as the YPAR iTAGs group and larger iTAGs community and also the baby steps I took into twitter, Pinterest, Facebook and Linked in.

·        My makes using digital tools such as:  social justice and science curations, urban youth themed memes, a valentines remix, gliffy map of my learning journey, and attempt to make a badge.

·        The maker space I started,  including the creation of activities for it, the community service project of having the maker students work with younger students,  and an open class blog

·        My weekly blog posts in my Making it Matter blog, and my tumblr S7S reflections blog.  

 

Where do you think you could have improved?

All of the above.  I am usually not satisfied with first attempts and so I always think I can improve by reflecting and trying things again. I had difficulty functioning in twitter, and especially in the twitter chat but I have decided to remain open minded and to keep on trying to get more comfortable with it.  I need to work at developing more connections through my blog and contributing more to the networked communities I have joined.    I need to work on my self confidence in order to do those things.  After a month of my maker space being up and running, it could use a lot of growth and development.  The main issue is that the students have not developed a shared sense of purpose in working toward a common goal.  I know that is the key to students wanting to engage in intellectually challenging work.

How do your successes and reflections on improvement inform your connected learning moving forward?

My goal and my challenge is how to get students to want to engage in intellectually rigorous work. For students in urban schools who have been traditionally marginalized in science education, this is a big challenge. The traditional models of education in which teachers try to tightly control the outcomes to fit tests and by using drilling of information causes great inequity in education.   Equity occurs when students work toward a common goal with a shared sense of purpose and see that they have a voice and can make change on problems and issues that matter to them.   However this is not an easy thing to have happen.  It must come from student interests and the problems that they have that go beyond the classroom. They must critically examine what they are learning and the structures that create inequity around them.   Education must be designed so that students can work collectively to make a change that they find meaningful.  Connected learning can help teachers create entry points for students to go down their own paths of discovery and identify formation.  

Going forward I will have to be more open and encouraging of a dialogue with students and getting to know students better in order to have this come from them.   When I receive curriculum that does not give students these dialogues and entry points, I will have to create them by hacking the curriculum to be more relevant for my students and open up spaces for creativity and connection to meaning. I will examine the content with the students with a critical eye.    I will use connected learning to break through the barriers they face and give students an authentic audience in order to solve real problems.  For example I was thinking of cultivating the relationships I make with the black and Latino scientists, (once I finally get connected with them) so my students can have interactive mentors for their science projects.  Also I was thinking they might come and attend the students’ final presentations of their projects and help me in creating badges for the students.  

By including connected learning and critical pedagogy perspectives and practices I hope to bring more equity to education.    This will require me to continue to develop myself as a connected educator and a critical pedagogue. This class pushed me to try new things and has resulted in the development of my identity as a connected learner and also to dream about trying these ideas out with my future classes when I am again in the role of a classroom teacher.  

Thanks for a great semester, Christina and if you have any ideas for another connected learning class you recommend please let me know.

Kathy

Final Make:  A Maker Space Make                  April 25, 2015

Teacher agency

Interest –powered

Peer-supported

Academically oriented

Production centered

Openly networked

Shared purpose

                            The changing social and technological landscape is up-ending what is effective teaching.   The “banking model” of education in which teachers deposit knowledge into students who are not meant to critically examine it, or create meaning for themselves is no longer relevant.    There are additional barriers in science education for African American and Latino students because science is presented in a way that does not represent their interests, their realities and their identities.  Most of science is taught either with examples and contexts that are not relevant to students in urban schools or presented in a de-contextualized manner. Furthermore, most of the media related to science does not show black and Latino scientists and engineers. These issues make it that much more difficult for black and Latino youth to imagine themselves as scientists and engineers of the future.    

         I found a school that set up a new model that allows students to follow their interests and passions in afternoon two hour studio electives. In an attempt to work to counteract some of the inequity I see in science education I volunteered to offer a studio elective called Engineering and Science Design.   On Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, students can either choose their own projects to work on, or work on some of the ideas I suggest.  On Wednesdays we do either a hands-on inquiry-based science experiment or an engineering challenge and then the students spend an hour reflecting and writing in their Design logs about their experiences.   I have specifically designed writing prompts to help them in applying their knowledge and skills from their making experiences as evidence of school wide competencies they must earn in scientific inquiry and habits of success” in order to graduate.   I encourage the students to take photos of their projects and write a few sentences about them in our class blog.  

              Many of the students have selected this studio because they did not earn the competencies they needed for graduation in their science class and are trying to catch up.  Some of them are in the studio because they enjoy making things with their hands.  Some of the students are there because they were deemed behavioral problems in other classes.  My hope was that they will see the power that comes from DIY projects and also make progress in creating their own identities.  

           The first Wednesday challenge I gave them was The Community Engineering Challenge,  in which student teams design a method that would move pool water out of the community recreation center pool, working within a set of limited resources.   I have one team of 3 students, one team of 2 students and a student working individually to design and build pinball machines from scratch.  I have one student creating a head scarf with an Arduino controlled circuit of LEDS. I have two students doing small crafts projects with plastics and one student experimenting and making skin care products.  On Wednesday the experiment we did was to design a way for some cheese business owners to improve the cost efficiency of their cheese making process in the Cheese Making Challenge.   The next design challenge they will be given is the Tissue Re-messaging Challenge.

     My  Reflections:

           When I was thinking about how this maker space illustrates the principles of connected learning I believe it demonstrates several of them, however still has some work to go before it fully applies them.  For me, this is an experiment that will go on after this class.  With my effort to reflect and evaluate on the mistakes I’m making along the way, I’m sure it will go through several iterations as I learn.

               Although I give the students engineering challenges, inquiry experiments and writing experiences once a week, students spend most of the time working on their creations which are student-interest driven.  I have ongoing individual conversations with students to see what they are interested in and then I help them try to find a way to pursue those interests. In this production centered class, students have been given the opportunity to tinker, experiment, explore, trouble shoot and problem solve.   They have been repositioned as producers and makers who are creating knowledge from their own experiences.  

           The equity comes from several facts.  The learning is based on student interest which helps them connect to their own lived realities and experiences.   Secondly, they are using the production processes scientists and engineers use to learn. This helps them see themselves as scientists and engineers.  This also makes them try to figure out what they need in order to be able to make or learn something. It changes their perspective of themselves in which they are the agent of their own learning.  They begin to see that their failures are stepping stones to deeper learning.  

            Another principle of connected learning demonstrated by this maker space is that students are publishing what they are doing through the class blog to a wider audience.  Sharing what they are doing and thinking about it with others in networked communities brings equity into education for the students. We have gone further than a blog yet but that is a goal. Most of these students are reading far below grade level and struggle with writing and mathematics.  However, the projects they are doing have embedded in them academic literacy practice.  By reaching out to authentic audiences, students will see their own                         power in being able to learn for themselves.  

             This maker space does not fulfill all of the connected learning principles to the extent that I had hoped.   The students have been helping each other on their projects, however it has been very difficult to get students to work in teams towards a shared purpose.  

  As I mentioned previously, an area to improve is also in social networking. I would like the results of the class blog to eventually connect with others with similar interests where students could interact and participate in a learning community.    

     Another area of needed improvement is the academic orientation of the class.  I am having them write and read and speak, however there needs to be more editing and revisions and more rigorous academic and critical literacy work built in.  

        Overall, after evaluating the strengths and weakness of this model,   I believe it just doesn’t do enough to break through the structural issues getting in the way of equity.  It needs a more powerful shared purpose that involves action to change a problem that the students care about.  This could motivate students to engage in the critical literacy work they need to help them catch up in their academic literacy skills. Additionally, it could help student bring about changes that solve real problems they have.

            Having students doing work to solve real problems, such as through YPAR-youth participatory action projects that they have identified could help students to work toward academic excellence.  However, right now I have not built this kind of opportunity into the class. The closest I have come is to create a STEM program at an after school program at a City Recreation center near the school and have planned for my students to lead a workshop for the younger children.  Unfortunately I feel that this idea needed to have come from them.   From my experience putting young people in a leadership role helps them build their self-confidence, however it may still not result in academic excellence.  In addition to making things, I believe the students need to be doing research that involves reading, collecting and analyzing data that involves computing skills, and presenting their work which requires presentation and communication skills.  Including a more critical approach to the maker space would give students more power and to be heard in ways that would engage them as agents of change in their communities.  

           I know I am pretty hard on myself given that I was pretty much doing this all by myself.   More support from the school or a partnership with more experienced maker coaches would be one avenue to try.  Just today at a workshop I attended at the iTAGS conference I met the coaches of one of the maker spaces of a school which happens to be in the same building as the school where I am.  I thought how wonderful it would be to work in a school where these goals are part of the school institutional structure.  It was helpful seeing how they approached their maker spaces for social justice.   Through my connected learning networks, I will be on the lookout for ideas for more ways I can try to accomplish these objectives.    

I enjoyed the ED677, especially with giving us a chance to experiment and make mistakes and learn from them.  I liked the way we could take our own paths based on our own interests and experience.  I enjoyed our shared purpose and support of each other. We got to experience connected learning as we learned about connected learning-a good way to learn.    Thanks to you all who have made it possible.           

                                          Signing off,  


                                                 Kathy

 

Final Make:  A Maker Space Make                  April 25, 2015

Teacher agency

Interest –powered

Peer-supported

Academically oriented

Production centered

Openly networked

Shared purpose

                            The changing social and technological landscape is up-ending what is effective teaching.   The “banking model” of education in which teachers deposit knowledge into students who are not meant to critically examine it, or create meaning for themselves is no longer relevant.    There are additional barriers in science education for African American and Latino students because science is presented in a way that does not represent their interests, their realities and their identities.  Most of science is taught either with examples and contexts that are not relevant to students in urban schools or presented in a de-contextualized manner. Furthermore, most of the media related to science does not show black and Latino scientists and engineers. These issues make it that much more difficult for black and Latino youth to imagine themselves as scientists and engineers of the future.    

         I found a school that set up a new model that allows students to follow their interests and passions in afternoon two hour studio electives. In an attempt to work to counteract some of the inequity I see in science education I volunteered to offer a studio elective called Engineering and Science Design.   On Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, students can either choose their own projects to work on, or work on some of the ideas I suggest.  On Wednesdays we do either a hands-on inquiry-based science experiment or an engineering challenge and then the students spend an hour reflecting and writing in their Design logs about their experiences.   I have specifically designed writing prompts to help them in applying their knowledge and skills from their making experiences as evidence of school wide competencies they must earn in scientific inquiry and habits of success” in order to graduate.   I encourage the students to take photos of their projects and write a few sentences about them in our class blog.  

              Many of the students have selected this studio because they did not earn the competencies they needed for graduation in their science class and are trying to catch up.  Some of them are in the studio because they enjoy making things with their hands.  Some of the students are there because they were deemed behavioral problems in other classes.  My hope was that they will see the power that comes from DIY projects and also make progress in creating their own identities.  

           The first Wednesday challenge I gave them was The Community Engineering Challenge,  in which student teams design a method that would move pool water out of the community recreation center pool, working within a set of limited resources.   I have one team of 3 students, one team of 2 students and a student working individually to design and build pinball machines from scratch.  I have one student creating a head scarf with an Arduino controlled circuit of LEDS. I have two students doing small crafts projects with plastics and one student experimenting and making skin care products.  On Wednesday the experiment we did was to design a way for some cheese business owners to improve the cost efficiency of their cheese making process in the Cheese Making Challenge.   The next design challenge they will be given is the Tissue Re-messaging Challenge.

     My  Reflections:

           When I was thinking about how this maker space illustrates the principles of connected learning I believe it demonstrates several of them, however still has some work to go before it fully applies them.  For me, this is an experiment that will go on after this class.  With my effort to reflect and evaluate on the mistakes I’m making along the way, I’m sure it will go through several iterations as I learn.

               Although I give the students engineering challenges, inquiry experiments and writing experiences once a week, students spend most of the time working on their creations which are student-interest driven.  I have ongoing individual conversations with students to see what they are interested in and then I help them try to find a way to pursue those interests. In this production centered class, students have been given the opportunity to tinker, experiment, explore, trouble shoot and problem solve.   They have been repositioned as producers and makers who are creating knowledge from their own experiences.  

           The equity comes from several facts.  The learning is based on student interest which helps them connect to their own lived realities and experiences.   Secondly, they are using the production processes scientists and engineers use to learn. This helps them see themselves as scientists and engineers.  This also makes them try to figure out what they need in order to be able to make or learn something. It changes their perspective of themselves in which they are the agent of their own learning.  They begin to see that their failures are stepping stones to deeper learning.  

            Another principle of connected learning demonstrated by this maker space is that students are publishing what they are doing through the class blog to a wider audience.  Sharing what they are doing and thinking about it with others in networked communities brings equity into education for the students. We have gone further than a blog yet but that is a goal. Most of these students are reading far below grade level and struggle with writing and mathematics.  However, the projects they are doing have embedded in them academic literacy practice.  By reaching out to authentic audiences, students will see their own                         power in being able to learn for themselves.  

             This maker space does not fulfill all of the connected learning principles to the extent that I had hoped.   The students have been helping each other on their projects, however it has been very difficult to get students to work in teams towards a shared purpose.  

  As I mentioned previously, an area to improve is also in social networking. I would like the results of the class blog to eventually connect with others with similar interests where students could interact and participate in a learning community.    

     Another area of needed improvement is the academic orientation of the class.  I am having them write and read and speak, however there needs to be more editing and revisions and more rigorous academic and critical literacy work built in.  

        Overall, after evaluating the strengths and weakness of this model,   I believe it just doesn’t do enough to break through the structural issues getting in the way of equity.  It needs a more powerful shared purpose that involves action to change a problem that the students care about.  This could motivate students to engage in the critical literacy work they need to help them catch up in their academic literacy skills. Additionally, it could help student bring about changes that solve real problems they have.

            Having students doing work to solve real problems, such as through YPAR-youth participatory action projects that they have identified could help students to work toward academic excellence.  However, right now I have not built this kind of opportunity into the class. The closest I have come is to create a STEM program at an after school program at a City Recreation center near the school and have planned for my students to lead a workshop for the younger children.  Unfortunately I feel that this idea needed to have come from them.   From my experience putting young people in a leadership role helps them build their self-confidence, however it may still not result in academic excellence.  In addition to making things, I believe the students need to be doing research that involves reading, collecting and analyzing data that involves computing skills, and presenting their work which requires presentation and communication skills.  Including a more critical approach to the maker space would give students more power and to be heard in ways that would engage them as agents of change in their communities.  

           I know I am pretty hard on myself given that I was pretty much doing this all by myself.   More support from the school or a partnership with more experienced maker coaches would be one avenue to try.  Just today at a workshop I attended at the iTAGS conference I met the coaches of one of the maker spaces of a school which happens to be in the same building as the school where I am.  I thought how wonderful it would be to work in a school where these goals are part of the school institutional structure.  It was helpful seeing how they approached their maker spaces for social justice.   Through my connected learning networks, I will be on the lookout for ideas for more ways I can try to accomplish these objectives.    

I enjoyed the ED677, especially with giving us a chance to experiment and make mistakes and learn from them.  I liked the way we could take our own paths based on our own interests and experience.  I enjoyed our shared purpose and support of each other. We got to experience connected learning as we learned about connected learning-a good way to learn.    Thanks to you all who have made it possible.           

                                          Signing off,  


                                                 Kathy

 

My Final S7S

It is with a Heavy Heart and sad final week of classes that I have to report my last S7S for this term.

1) I appreciate all of my teachers this term, and their faith in my and I thank them for never giving up on me.

2) I appreciate my Where I am From poem that I have made as my make, and my books of quotes that I started this term. all of the positive vibes I received this semester has stuck with me.

3) I appreciate Christina Cantrill sharing with us her Six Images. It seems like an amazing idea that I can introduce students to when I start teaching.

4) I appreciate the teacher who asked her what they wished that she knew. Because I think it’s important that every teacher do this in all of their classes. I feel like this could be a way to give kids a safe haven or an outlet or anyway for the teacher to help them. .

5)I appreciate Badges, and Connected Learning in ways I didn’t think I would. Finding new ways to set up meetings and group meetings and different place to come together for a common purpose.

6) I appreciate Clequity, Techquity, and the ability to learn and teach through games.  I Lost the game AGAIN!

7) I appreciate that technology, and connected learning allow  teachers to teach children that the World Is round, and that I can hangout on google with someone in china via technology. I love technology and all it does to help us and our students.


Readings re: Science and Social Justice Teaching

Excerpted compilation by Kathy Walsh, April 6 2015

I am reading a book called The Art of Critical Pedagogy:   Possibilities for Moving from theory to practice in urban schools,  which is filled with very empowering ways to engage students who have been marginalized in schools.  Other books I have read in the past month that have a lot of Student-driven action projects and ideas for engagement:  Deep Knowledge: learning to teach science for understanding and equity by Douglas B. Larkin; Urban Science Education for the Hip-Hop Generation by Christopher Emdin; Teaching Science for Social Justice by Angela Calabrese Barton, and Democratic Science Teaching: building expertise to empower low income minority youth in science by Basu, Calabrese, and Tan. and Empowering Science and Mathematics in Urban Schools by Tan, Calabrese, & Barton.   For science teachers there seems not to be a lot on the subject of teaching for social justice compared to teachers of other subjects so I thought this list could prove helpful if this is something you are interested in. 

F5F week 10.

1) I appreciate the gift of patient & understanding teachers.

2) I appreciate the gift of amazing students & teachers that share some really motivating and amazing videos that truly make me think of ways to change and how i can use connected learning, and my passion for reading as a gift to help someone else.

3) I appreciate that shared interests make for more amazing learning experiences and that I can share my shared interests with new people all of the time and meet new people everyday.

4) I appreciate that Spring has Sprung, its almost April and the showers have started to bring us those May Flowers. My Tree has little buds on them.

5) I appreciate that through-out this semester i have met many amazing people from many walks of life and they are all pretty amazing.

6) I appreciate YesPhilly and what they are doing for young adults, and the Video Pushouts & Dropouts.

7) I appreciate Joy Kirr’s Passion-Based Learning Video because I am passionate about reading and I want to let me students teach me what they are passionate about.
Enjoy your weekend everyone,

Amy


Connected Learning Week 10

Wow, Week 10! It seems like the semester just started and we are already past the half way point. When I started this Journey into connected learning I definitely felt like I was taking these classes to not only get better at teaching computers, but helping my students do better work with technology.  Technology is a friend, not the enemy, and I find as I work with other teachers that are not tech-friendly they decide against using technology in their own classrooms. Heres what I have learned. Technology is an amazing way to connect with each other in so many lessons. I love the fact that in my class I’ve met several people from the many different Writing projects, as well as people who use Games to teach their classroom. ( I just lost the game)!  I am finding that when I was younger and wanted more than anything to just make different things whether it was cooking or baking, or a bead bracelet/ necklace, Now i can use technology and search for different communities of practice. Take for example author Jane Austen. If you type into your Google search box: Jane Austen there is a Jane Austen Society, you can also search for Jane Austen groups on twitter and Facebook and meet new people that way. I love that technology gives us freedoms to express ourselves as well as connect with amazing people. Connected learning is an amazing tool to have in every school and classroom.

Amy


Pushouts & Dropouts in Philadelphia Schools. (response)

Today I was able to sit down and watch this video. To say I was surprised was an understatement. First off, I want to thank Lizzie for sharing this video with us. I feel like these young adults are right. We need to be the adults to help them. As someone studying to be a reading specialist I find that we are responsible for helping these young adults with whatever they need, we need to be the advocate for them.  There is no reason that a high school student should be reading on a 3rd grade level. These young adults want to turn their lives around and we should help them. This video opened my eyes to many problems, but also many solutions to things in the future when I have my own classroom.

Amy